Series 3, Part 1 by Jill Hyem

First broadcast: Sunday 7 October 1984

1 July 1945. The women’s third camp. While Blanche, Daisy, Verna and Suzy are all dead, new friends include Maggie and Alice. At tenko, Christina translates more Japanese propaganda about the war from Sato who is still their commandant. News from the natives suggests that the Allies are doing much better than their captors would have them believe. Sato tries to force Beatrice to change a death certificate on which she has written malnutrition. Dorothy wonders if the Japanese might shoot them before the Allies arrive. Yamauchi discovers he has a grandson and, when asked, gives Christina some biscuits for Alice’s 17th birthday. Sato puts a stop to Alice’s simple celebrations. The following month, Joss finds a leaflet outside the camp that has been air-dropped by the Allies and the women speculate further about their advance. Yamauchi informs Christina that she will no longer work at Headquarters. Before Christina  returns to the camp she reads an order stating that when the Allies attack South East Asia all prisoners are to be massacred. Marion and Joss inform a prisoners’ committee that they plan to make a fight of it using stones they have been gathering and to take Yamauchi hostage.  The committee agrees to the plan but they chose not to tell Dorothy fearing that she cannot be trusted, but Maggie tells her anyway. The committee divvy out ammunition. When Yamauchi visits for a tenko the women prepare for the worst, but it transpires that he has instead come to tell them that the war is over. The stunned women begin to celebrate. Marion takes charge and asks to speak to Yamauchi who tells her about the Japanese surrender following the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, that they must remain under Japanese protection until the Allies arrive and that there must be no acts of revenge against them. Elsewhere in the camp, Maggie is gathering a group of women together to pay back Sato for the suffering he has put them through.

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About Andy Priestner

Trainer and consultant on social media, marketing and comms, user experience and ethnography, leadership, strategic thinking, change and LEGO Serious Play
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